Category Archives: Economics of Education

Two different problems in education

I liked the distinction drawn by a commenter. distinguish two situations. One, the student wants to learn about something, because she finds it interesting or wants to use it for something. She wants to learn and wants the knowledge to … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 3 Comments

Peter Diamindis on reinventing education

He wrote, I just returned from a week in China meeting with parents whose focus on kids’ education is extraordinary. One of the areas I found fascinating is how some of the most advanced parents are teaching their kids new … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 5 Comments

Could Elite Colleges Expand?

In the course of the podcast with Russ Roberts, Tyler Cowen says I think that a Harvard/California could work. I believe normatively Harvard should do it. I see zero signs they are about to. It would mean a dilution of … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 10 Comments

Polarized attitudes about college

Inside Higher Ed reports, Two years ago, 54 percent of Republicans said colleges had a positive impact on the country’s direction, with 37 percent rating higher education negatively…The latest version of the survey, conducted last month among 2,504 adults, for … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 33 Comments

Interesting sentences

From a commenter. People in education tend to believe two things: 1) School is America’s great driver of social mobility. School lifts up the poor. Without our education system, we would be a terribly unequal, unjust, “rich get richer and … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 16 Comments

Education Realist on Hansonian education reform

He or she comments, Harmful interventions: Ending tracking De-emphasizing demonstrated test scores on difficult tests in favor of grades. Increased legal protections for discipline disasters. …Costly interventions: Special education now gives additional money to 1 out of 8 kids and … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 22 Comments

What to Study?

Scott H. Young writes, Assuming you were to fulfill that high-minded goal of education, how would you do it? I find it doubtful that the traditional university curriculum would be the best way to do that. Probably the best way … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 26 Comments

The null hypothesis: do I really believe it?

A commenter writes, surely students who took statistics with you know statistics better than students who didn’t take statistics at all, right? The null hypothesis taken to the extreme would suggest that having taken your- or any- statistics course, should … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education | 37 Comments

Hansonian Schooling?

A commenter writes, The most difficult part of this worldview for me to reconcile has been to convince myself that the subset of negative-impact health interventions can have a large enough magnitude of an effect to counteract the health interventions … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education, Economics of Health Care | 14 Comments

Charter Schools and the Null Hypothesis

Neerav Kingsland writes, Overall, CMOs are delivering +.03 SD effects over three years in both reading and math. These gains are driven by the fact that students benefit from CMOs the longer they stay in them In this context, CMOs … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 13 Comments