Category Archives: books and book reviews

My recent reading

1. The Captured Economy, by Brink Lindsey and Steve Teles. I don’t think I have much more to say about it than what I wrote here. 2. How to Think, by Alan Jacobs. The topic of political emotionalism is something … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 1 Comment

The Richard Reeves recommendations

From a review of The Dream Hoarders: Reeves is optimistic, however, that the correct policy agenda can reverse this trend. His policy background shines through in the clarity of his seven-point agenda. The first four focus on equalizing human capital … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, income distribution-wealth-poverty | 20 Comments

Brink Lindsey and Steve Teles push liberaltarianism

the point of convergence is where anti-statism and egalitarianism meet That is from their new book, The Captured Economy. They discuss four areas in which public policy exacerbates inequality: housing finance subsidies, intellectual property protection, occupational licensing, and urban land-use … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, public choice, regulation | Tagged , | 8 Comments

More thoughts on disciplined software development

Tom Killalea wrote, Robert C. Martin described the single responsibility principle: “Gather together those things that change for the same reason. Separate those things that change for different reasons.” Clear separation of concerns, minimal coupling across domains of concern, and … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Social media and the art of thinking unreasonably

Here comes my rant against political uses of social media, notably Twitter and Facebook. Politics on social media is not reflective. It is not deliberative. It is not long-term thinking. It is short-term, reactive, tribal, and emotional. Social media facilitates … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics | Tagged | 11 Comments

The art of thinking reasonably

David Brooks starts out talking about Richard Thaler, but he moves on to recommend a forthcoming book by Alan Jacobs, called How to Think. Brooks writes, Jacobs nicely shows how our thinking processes emerge from emotional life and moral character. … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, David Brooks, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 1 Comment

The paradox of software development

I finished Tim O’Reilly’s WTF. For the most part, his discussion of the way that the evolution of technology affects the business environment is really insightful. This is particularly true around chapter 6, where he describes how companies try to … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics | Tagged | 12 Comments

Re-litigating Netscape vs. Microsoft

In WTF, Tim O’Reilly writes, Netscape, built to commercialize the web browser, had decided to provide the source code to its browser as a free software project using the name Mozilla. Under competitive pressure from Microsoft, which had built a … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics, links to my essays | Tagged | 9 Comments

Re-litigating Open Source Software

In his new book, Tim O’Reilly reminisces fondly about the origins of “open source” software, which he dates to 1998. Well he might, for his publishing company made much of its fortune selling books about various open source languages. In … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics, links to my essays | Tagged | 18 Comments

What I’m Reading

Tim O’Reilly’s new book. He tries to grasp how technology affects the current business environment. He then proceeds to look at the overall economic and social implications. You can get some of the flavor of it by listening to his … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics, Introductory Economics, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | Tagged | 5 Comments