Category Archives: Economic education and methods

Thoughts on profits

I put this essay up on Medium. I like the concept of Medium. I would like to be able to reach some people who are on the left. Everyone seems to love the juvenile, anti-capitalist rants that people put up. … Continue reading

Posted in Introductory Economics | 8 Comments

John Ioannidis on Economics

Self-recommending. But here is an excerpt. Most empirical data do not come from experiments but from non-experimental sources such as surveys and routinely collected information. Along with Chris Doucouliagos and Tom Stanley, my research center examined 6,700 empirical studies encompassing … Continue reading

Posted in Economic education and methods, Mark Thoma is Indispensable | 2 Comments

Corporate tax cuts, math, and intellectual swindles

John Cochrane writes, Each dollar (per worker) of static tax losses raises wages by [more than one dollar] It’s always greater than one… A number greater than one does not mean you’re a moron, incapable of addition, a stooge of … Continue reading

Posted in Economic education and methods, Mark Thoma is Indispensable, PSST and Macro | Tagged | 8 Comments

What is the limit on firm size?

Miles Kimball wrote, Given the replication argument, there is no scale of operation that is beyond efficient scale. There may be ample reason to make different plants or divisions quasi-independent so they do not interfere with one another’s operations. But … Continue reading

Posted in business economics, Economic education and methods | Tagged | 7 Comments

What I’m Reading

Tim O’Reilly’s new book. He tries to grasp how technology affects the current business environment. He then proceeds to look at the overall economic and social implications. You can get some of the flavor of it by listening to his … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, business economics, Introductory Economics, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | Tagged | 5 Comments

Why pick on sociology?

A reader asks, Why do economists have such contempt for sociologists? …I was thinking of this because of your posts on “normative sociology” 1. The term “normative sociology” comes from Robert Nozick, and he described it as the study of … Continue reading

Posted in Economic education and methods, links to my essays | 5 Comments

Deirdre McCloskey on teaching economics

She writes, I think economics, like philosophy, cannot be taught to nineteen-year olds. . .A nineteen-year old has intimations of mortality, comes directly from a socialized economy (called a family), and has no feel on his pulse for the tragedies … Continue reading

Posted in Introductory Economics, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 19 Comments

Heterodox introductory economics

Samuel Bowles and Wendy Carlin write, The Economy takes on board the fundamental innovations of Hayek and Nash used in contemporary economics research. But concerns about climate and other market failures as well as economic instability provide reasons to doubt … Continue reading

Posted in Introductory Economics, Mark Thoma is Indispensable | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Criminology as normative sociology

John Paul Wright and Matt DeLisi write, Liberal political values can shape and distort the research that criminologists do and the public positions that they take. Lee Ellis and Anthony Walsh surveyed several hundred criminologists and found that self-reported ideological … Continue reading

Posted in Economic education and methods | 12 Comments

Think tanks and special interests

Daniel Drezner writes, New America is embroiled in a pay-for-play controversy of its own making. The New York Times reported that Slaughter had parted ways with Barry Lynn, an influential critic of the growing clout of U.S. tech companies. He … Continue reading

Posted in Economic education and methods, public choice | 7 Comments