Monthly Archives: November 2012

Home Ownership and Wealth

According to Edward Wolff, median wealth plummeted over the years 2007 to 2010, and by 2010 was at its lowest level since 1969. I see this as a result of the policy of encouraging the middle class to take a … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis of 2008, government debt crisis, Housing and housing finance | 3 Comments

The Left’s Post-Election Self-Examination?

Brad DeLong writes, Massachusetts has been walking down this exchange-and-public-program-expansion road for six years now, since Mitt Romney signed RomneyCare. Massachusetts has been vacuuming up doctors and nurses from Costa Rica and elsewhere and still has been finding that the … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Health Care, Politics, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 4 Comments

The Right’s Post-Election Self-examination

Tyler Cowen points to a David Brooks column that praises a number of right-of-center commentators who are more prominent in the blogsphere than elsewhere. Some thoughts of mine: I doubt that Mitt Romney ever considered drafting any of the people … Continue reading

Posted in David Brooks, Politics, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 4 Comments

Other Recent Essays of Mine

Reforming the Housing Transaction offers suggested improvements in the real estate process. Who Needs Home Ownership? suggests that the social benefits of home onwership are overstated. How to Think About QE3 gives an “on the one hand, on the other” … Continue reading

Posted in Housing and housing finance, Libertarian Thought, links to my essays, Monetary Economics | 4 Comments

MOOCs and Other Innovations in Education

In September, I published an opinionated survey of education and technology. Among other things, I said that I thought that the hype around MOOCs (massive online open courses) was overdone. Since writing that essay, one argument in favor of MOOCs … Continue reading

Posted in Economics of Education, links to my essays | 5 Comments

Deficit Spending and Political Conflict

In Lenders and Spenders, I recently wrote, this sets the political system up for conflict and strife in year two, when the burden of paying the debt has to be apportioned. As we have seen, it could be divided any … Continue reading

Posted in government debt crisis, links to my essays | 11 Comments

Inflation and the U.S. Debt Problem

Timothy Taylor wrote, if federal deficits are first definitively placed on a diminishing path, then a quiet surge of unexpected inflation could help in reducing the past debts. But on the current U.S. trajectory of a steadily-rising debt/GDP ratio over … Continue reading

Posted in government debt crisis, Timothy Taylor is my Favorite Blogger | 5 Comments

Non-fiction Books of the Year

Tyler Cowen gives his list. I agree on Charles Murray and George Dyson. I also read Gertner and Fallows (primarily on Tyler’s previous blog recommendations), and I was happy I did so but not ready to grant best-of-the-year status. My … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, Tyler Cowen is my Favorite Blogger | 10 Comments

Reviewing John Allison

I reviewed John A. Allison’s The Financial Crisis and the Free Market Cure for Reasonpapers. I think that one can learn from reading it. I agree with much of his analysis and I share many of his opinions. However, in … Continue reading

Posted in books and book reviews, Financial Crises, Financial Crisis of 2008, links to my essays | 1 Comment

Recycling Incentives

Timothy Taylor writes, If we want people to be serious about recycling, having a policy of 5-10 cents for returning cans and bottles is likely to be a more effective tools than curbside recycling. He points out that beverage companies … Continue reading

Posted in Introductory Economics, Timothy Taylor is my Favorite Blogger | 10 Comments